Purpose of Dental Bonding

What is the Purpose of Dental Bonding?

Dental bonding is a useful and versatile cosmetic dental procedure that is highly effective for treating a number of cosmetic dental problems. Bonding involves the use of a special resin that is applied to teeth and hardened with a special light to affix it permanently to the teeth.

Dental bonding is typically used to treat specific cosmetic dental issues. These issues include:

* Repair cracked or chipped teeth
* Fill cavities
* Cover discolored or badly stained teeth
* Improve spacing between teeth
* Reshape irregularly-shaped or unusually small teeth
* Lengthen teeth
* Cover tooth roots exposed by periodontal disease

At Vistasol Dental in Montebello, Dr. Noushin Adhami recommends dental bonding when the patient suffers from more than one cosmetic dental problem because this procedure is an efficient and cost-effective method for fixing a number of cosmetic dental issues at once. In addition, the process of applying dental bonding is not invasive and it does not involve the use of dental surgery.

To place dental bond, our dentist will first select the proper shade of resin. The resin can be custom matched to the patient’s teeth, or a brighter shade of resin can be chosen if the patient is applying dental bonds to improve the appearance of stained teeth. Teeth will then be prepared in order to accommodate for dental bonding. Special tools will be used by our dentist in order to slightly roughen the tooth enamel, forming an ideal surface for the bond to adhere to. The material will then be applied directly to the teeth, shaped and polished to the desired shape. Finally, dental bonding material will be cured with an ultraviolet light or with a laser.

Dental bond has several advantages over other methods of treating cosmetic dental problems. Dental bonding can usually be completed in just one office visit. This contrasts with dental veneers or crowns, which require two or more visits as well as a waiting period while the dental laboratory creates the custom set of veneers or crowns.

This method of fixing cosmetic dental problems is not quite as durable as crowns or veneers, however. The dental bond can chip or break more easily and it is also more prone to stains than porcelain or ceramic.

If you are interested in learning more about dental bonding, contact Dr. Noushin Adhami our cosmetic dentist at Vistasol Dental in Montebello. She will examine your teeth and recommend a method of treating your cosmetic dental problem that is appropriate for your unique needs.

10 Tips for Families healthy teeth for life

You have so many good reasons to keep your family’s teeth and gums healthy. Their sparkling smiles. Being able to chew for good nutrition. Avoiding toothaches and discomfort. And new research suggests that gum disease can lead to other problems in the body, including increased risk of heart disease.
Fortunately, there are simple ways to keep teeth strong and healthy from childhood to old age. Here’s how:

1. Start children early. Despite great strides in decay prevention, one in four young children develops signs of tooth decay before they start school. Half of all children between the ages of 12 and 15 have cavities. Dental care should begin as soon as a child’s first tooth appears, usually around six months. Teeth can be wiped with a clean, damp cloth or a very soft brush. At about age 2, you can let kids try brushing for themselves — although it’s important to supervise.

2. Seal off trouble. Permanent molars come in around age 6. Thin protective coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth can prevent decay in the pits and fissures. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, sealants can significantly reduce caries. Yet only one in three U.S. kids receives dental sealants. Talk to our dental team at Vistasol Dental for more information about dental sealant.

3. Use enough — but not too much — fluoride. The single biggest advance in oral health has been fluoride, which strengthens enamel, making it less likely to decay. Three out of four Americans drink water that is fluoridated. If your water isn’t fluoridated, talk to your dental professional, who may suggest putting a fluoride application on your teeth. Many toothpastes and mouth rinses also contain fluoride. Fluoride should be used sparingly in young children — no more than a pea-sized dab on the toothbrush. Too much can cause white spots on teeth.

4. Brush twice a day and floss daily. Gum disease and tooth decay remain big problems — and not just for older people. Three-fourths of teenagers have gums that bleed, according to the ADHA. Along with the basic advice, remember:
* Toothbrushes should be changed 3 to 4 times a year.
* Teenagers with braces may need to use special toothbrushes and other oral hygiene tools to brush their teeth. Talk to our dentist at Vistasol Dental in Montebello.
* Older people with arthritis or other problems may have trouble holding a toothbrush or using floss. Some people find it easier to use an electric toothbrush. Others simply put a bicycle grip or foam tube over the handle of a regular toothbrush to make it easier to hold.

5. Rinse or chew gum after meals. In addition to brushing and flossing, rinsing your mouth with an antibacterial rinse can help prevent decay and gum problems. Chewing sugar-free gum after a meal can also protect by increasing saliva flow, which naturally washes bacteria away and neutralizes acid.

6. Block blows to teeth. Sports and recreational activities build healthy bodies, but they can pose a threat to teeth. Most school teams now require children to wear mouth guards. But remember: unsupervised recreational activities like skate-boarding and roller-blading can also result in injuries. At Vistasol Dental, our dentist can make a custom-fitted mouth guard.

7. Don’t smoke or use smokeless tobacco. Tobacco stains teeth and significantly increases the risk of gum disease and oral cancer. If you smoke or use chewing tobacco, consider quitting. Counsel your kids not to start.

8. Eat smart. At every age, a healthy diet is essential to healthy teeth and gums. A well-balanced diet of whole foods — including grains, nuts, fruits and vegetables, and dairy products — will provide all the nutrients you need. Some researchers believe that omega-3 fats, the kind found in fish, may also reduce inflammation, thereby lowering risk of gum disease.

9. Avoid sugary foods. When bacteria in the mouth break down simple sugars, they produce acids that can erode tooth enamel, opening the door to decay. “Sugary drinks, including soft drinks and fruit drinks, pose a special threat because people tend to sip them, raising acid levels over a long period of time.

10. Make an appointment. Most experts recommend a dental check-up every 6 months more often if you have problems like gum disease. During a routine exam, our dentist may remove plaque build-up that you can’t brush or floss away and look for signs of decay. A regular dental exam also spots:

* Early signs of oral cancer. Nine out of 10 cases of oral cancer can be treated if found early enough. Undetected, oral cancer can spread to other parts of the body and become harder to treat.
* Wear and tear from tooth grinding. Called bruxism, teeth grinding may be caused by stress or anxiety. Over time, it can wear down the biting surfaces of teeth, making them more susceptible to decay. If your teeth show signs of bruxism, our dentist may recommend a mouth guard worn at night to prevent grinding.
* Signs of gum disease. Gum disease, also called gingivitis or periodontitis, is the leading cause of tooth loss in older people. Periodically, your dental professional should examine your gums for signs of trouble.
* Interactions with medications. Older patients, especially those on multiple medications, are at risk of dry mouth, or xerostomia. Reduced saliva flow increases the risk of decay and gum problems. As many as 800 different drugs cause dry mouth as a side effect. Always tell your dental professional about any medications you take. A change in prescriptions may help alleviate the problem. Saliva-like oral mouthwashes are also available.

Brushing teeth before or after meal?

Should you brush your teeth before or after breakfast? Dental tips and advice for oral hygiene

The British Dental Association said you should brush your teeth the last thing at night and on one other occasion during the day

MOST people have their own routine when it comes to cleaning their teeth.
But how often should you be brushing them, and should you do it before or after breakfast?
The British Dental Association said you should brush your teeth the last thing at night and on one other occasion during the day.
A spokesperson said: “If breakfast is your preferred time to brush, it doesn’t matter whether you do this before or after eating.
“However, if it is the latter, you should wait an hour before brushing.”
Acidic food, like fruit and juices, can wear down enamel, so if you brush straight away you might damage your teeth.

How often should you brush your teeth?
The British Dental Association confirmed that you should brush teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste.
And you should spend at least two minutes making sure your pegs are properly clean.
Despite the name, brushing isn’t just about the teeth.
It’s important to clean the area between the teeth and gums to make sure no food is stuck there – as this is what causes cavities.

What technique should you use for brushing your teeth?
Make sure you brush all the surfaces of all your teeth and gently along the gum line: brush inside, outside, and the chewing surfaces of your teeth.
After brushing, spit out any excess toothpaste.
Don’t rinse your mouth out after brushing, as it will wash away the concentrated fluoride in the remaining toothpaste.
This will dilute it and reduce its preventative effects.
It’s also important to clean in between the teeth, using interdental brushes or floss where the space is too tight for these brushes.
If you are unsure of how to brush, seek advice from a dentist or hygienist.

Gingivitis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment At Vistasol Dental

Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums (gingiva). It commonly occurs because of a film of bacteria that accumulate on the teeth – plaque; this is known as plaque-induced gingivitis.
Gingivitis is a non-destructive type of periodontal disease. However, if left untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, which is more serious and can eventually lead to loss of teeth.

Gingivitis is a common type of periodontal disease.
A patient with gingivitis will have red and puffy gums, and they will most likely bleed when they brush their teeth. Generally, gingivitis resolves with good oral hygiene – longer and more frequent brushing, as well as flossing. Some people find that using an antiseptic mouthwash, alongside proper tooth brushing and flossing also helps.
In mild cases of gingivitis, patients may not even know they have it, because symptoms are mild. However, the condition should be taken seriously and addressed immediately.

Types of gingivitis
There are two main categories of gingival diseases:
Dental plaque-induced gingival disease: this can be caused by plaque, systemic factors, medications, or malnutrition.
Non-plaque induced gingival lesions: this can be caused by a specific bacterium, virus, or fungus. It might also be caused by genetic factors, systemic conditions (including allergic reactions and certain illnesses), wounds, or reactions to foreign bodies (such as dentures). Alternatively, no cause might be found.

What causes gingivitis?
The most common cause of gingivitis is the accumulation of bacterial plaque between and around the teeth; the plaque triggers an immune response, which, in turn, can eventually lead to the destruction of gingival (gum) tissue. It may also, eventually, lead to further complications, including the loss of teeth.
Dental plaque
Dental plaque is a biofilm that accumulates naturally on the teeth. It is usually formed by colonizing bacteria that are trying to stick to the smooth surface of a tooth. Some experts believe that these bacteria might help protect the mouth from the colonization of harmful microorganisms. However, dental plaque can also cause tooth decay, and periodontal problems such as gingivitis and chronic periodontitis, a gum infection.
When plaque is not removed adequately, it can harden into calculus (tartar – it has a yellow color) at the base of the teeth, near the gums. Calculus is harder to remove, and can only be removed professionally.
Plaque and tartar eventually irritate the gums, this eventually causes inflammation of the part of the gums around the base of the teeth. This means that the gums might easily bleed.

Other causes and risk factors
Changes in hormones – which may occur during puberty, menopause, the menstrual cycle, and pregnancy. The gingiva might become more sensitive, raising the risk of inflammation.
Some diseases – such as cancer, diabetes, and HIV are linked to a higher risk of developing gingivitis.
Drugs – oral health may be affected by some medications, especially if saliva flow is reduced. Dilantin (anticonvulsant), and some anti-angina medications can cause abnormal growth of gum tissue.
Smoking – regular smokers more commonly develop gingivitis compared with non-smokers.
Age – the risk of gingivitis increases with age.
Poor diet – especially people with vitamin C deficiency.
Family history – experts say that people whose parent(s) has/had gingivitis, have a higher risk of developing it too. This is thought to be due to the type of bacteria we acquire during our early life.

Signs and symptoms of gingivitis
In mild cases of gingivitis, there may be no discomfort or noticeable symptoms.
Signs and symptoms of gingivitis might include:
* Gums are bright red or purple.
* Gums are tender and sometimes painful to the touch.
* Gums bleed easily when brushing teeth or flossing.
* Halitosis (bad breath).
* Inflammation (swollen gums).
* Receding gums.
* Soft gums.

Diagnosing gingivitis
At Vistasol dental Montebello, our dentist, Dr. Noushin Adhami will check for gingivitis symptoms, such as plaque and tartar in the oral cavity.
Checking for signs of periodontitis may also be recommended; this may be done by X-ray or periodontal probing (an instrument that measures pocket depths around a tooth).

Treatment options for gingivitis
If the patient is diagnosed early on, and treatment is prompt and proper, gingivitis can be successfully reversed.
Treatment involves care by a dental professional, and follow-up procedures carried out by the patient at home.
Gingivitis care with a dental professional:
Teeth before scaling and 9 days after.
Plaque and tartar are removed. This is known as scaling. Some patients may find scaling uncomfortable, especially if tartar build-up is extensive, or the gums are very sensitive.
The dental professional explains to the patient the importance of oral hygiene, and how to effectively brush their teeth and floss.
Periodically, they may follow up on the patient, with more frequent cleanings if necessary.
It is also important to fix teeth so that oral hygiene can be done effectively.
Some dental problems, such as crooked teeth, badly fitted crowns or bridges, may make it harder to properly remove plaque and tartar (they may also irritate the gums).
What the patient can do at home:
* Brush teeth at least twice a day.
* Bear in mind that in most cases, electric toothbrushes do a better job than we can do on our own.
* Floss teeth at least once a day.
* Regularly rinse mouth with an antiseptic mouthwash. Ask a dentist to recommend one.
*
Possible complications from gingivitis
In the vast majority of cases, if gingivitis is treated and the patient follows the dental health professional’s instructions, there are no complications. However, if the condition is left untreated, gum disease can spread and affect tissue, teeth, and bones, leading to periodontitis.
Complications can include:
* Abscess in the gingiva.
* Abscess in the jaw bones.
* Infection in the jaw bone or gingiva.
* Periodontitis – this is a more serious condition that can lead to loss of teeth due to bone loss.
* Recurrent gingivitis.
* Trench mouth – ulceration of the gums caused by bacterial infection.
Several studies have linked gum diseases, such as periodontitis, to cardiovascular diseases, including heart attack or stroke. Other reports have found an association with lung disease risk.

Dental Crown Restoration

A Dental Crown Restoration Might Be Necessary for Treating a Tooth with a Broken or Bad Dental Filli

The material used for your dental fillings will not be vulnerable to the acidic and bacterial effects of tooth decay. However, it is still possible for these forces to gradually weaken the bond between an older dental filling and the adjacent tooth enamel.
As this starts to happen the tooth might become increasingly sensitive, or experience a change in texture and color. In the case of a large dental filling that’s failing, there simply might not be enough healthy tooth enamel remaining to apply a new dental filling.
In a case like this, Dr. Noushin Adhami at Vistasol Dental might recommend restoring the tooth with dental crown. This mode of treatment will completely replace the tooth’s enamel layer with another material such as Porcelain ceramic.
This treatment process involves Dr. Adhami numbing the tooth before using a dental hand piece to remove the dental filling and any remaining tooth enamel. This will leave a small portion of tooth for crown base or she may need to apply a device which is known as an abutment. It will eventually anchor your dental crown in your mouth.
Once this is done Dr. Noushin Adhami will prepare an impression of the area. This will be sent to a dental lab where technicians will prepare your dental crown.
Your will need to come in for a second appointment when your dental crown is ready to be cemented permanently.
If you live in Montebello,CA and you have a tooth with a broken or old bad filling, you should call 323–346-0208 to have it treated at The Art of Dentistry in Vistasol Dental Clinic.

before and after dental crown restoration

Cosmetic Dentistry

Cosmetic dentistry offers everything from teeth whitening to complete smile makeovers. Learn about your options here.

Cosmetic dentistry isn’t just for celebrities and the wealthy patients. There’s now a wide variety of options and price ranges that put a better smile within reach for millions of people.
“Cosmetic dentistry has gone mainstream” says Noushin Adhami, Doctor of Dental Surgery at Vistasol dental in Montebello,Ca.
Just about every dentist does at least some cosmetic dentistry procedures these days.
From subtle changes to major oral surgery, there are a host of cosmetic dentistry techniques that can treat teeth that are discolored, chipped, misshapen, or missing.
So is cosmetic dentistry right for you? Here’s what you need to know before making the decision.

What Is Cosmetic Dentistry?

While traditional dentistry addresses the health of your teeth and gums, cosmetic dentistry focuses on the appearance of your teeth, mouth, and smile.

“Recent advances in cosmetic dentistry allow dentists to offer everything from improved teeth whitening to translucent tooth coverings to complete smile makeovers,” says Dr. Adhami. Cosmetic dentistry has been around for decades, but the materials used today are more durable and natural looking than those used in the past.
According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), two-thirds of patients seeking cosmetic dentistry are female, and the average amount spent on cosmetic procedures by these patients in 2007 was a little less than $4,000. However, some cosmetic dentistry procedures can cost as little as $300.

Cosmetic Dentistry Options

There are a variety of cosmetic dentistry procedures available, including:

* Teeth whitening. This procedure brightens teeth that are discolored or stained. Teeth whitening, or bleaching, can be done in a dentist’s office or at home with a system dispensed by the dentist. Over-the-counter teeth-whitening products are also available.
* Bonding. This can improve the appearance of teeth that are chipped, broken, cracked, stained, or have spaces in between them, by bonding tooth-colored materials to the tooth surface.
* Veneers. These are thin, custom-made porcelain shells that cover the front of the teeth to disguise discoloration or imperfections.
* Tooth reshaping. This procedure involves changing the teeth to improve their appearance by modifying or removing enamel. Tooth reshaping (also known as dental contouring) is often combined with bonding.
* Crown lengthening . This can fix a “gummy” smile (where more gums than teeth are visible) or an uneven gum line by removing excess gum tissue to expose more of the tooth’s crown and give the appearance of longer teeth. This involves minor oral surgery.
* Smile makeovers. These procedures involve a comprehensive assessment of the overall appearance of the teeth and smile. Typically, several cosmetic dentistry procedures are required to overhaul the look of a patient’s smile. Think of it as a facelift for the mouth.
If you are interested to discuss your dental cosmetic goals, We at Vistasol Dental encourage you to call 323-346-0208 for making an appointment with our Cosmetic dentist.

cosmetic dental clinic patients smile

Periodontal Disease

Periodontal Probe Exam

If you have “Bleeding Gums” you may be at risk!

The primary purpose of a periodontal probe is to measure pocket depths around a tooth in order to establish the state of health of the periodontium.

Proper use of the periodontal probe is necessary to maintain accuracy. The tip of the instrument is placed with light pressure of 10-20 grams into the gingival sulcus, which is an area of potential space between a tooth and the surrounding tissue. It is important to keep the periodontal probe parallel to the contours of the root of the tooth and to insert the probe down to the base of the pocket. This results in obscuring a section of the periodontal probe’s tip. The first marking visible above the pocket indicates the measurement of the pocket depth. It has been found that the average, healthy pocket depth is around 3 mm with no bleeding upon probing. Depths greater than 3 mm can be associated with “attachment loss” of the tooth to the surrounding alveolar bone, which is a characteristic found in periodontitis. Pocket depths greater than 3 mm can also be a sign of gingival hyperplasia.
The periodontal probe can also be used to measure other dental instruments, tooth preparations during restorative procedures, gingival recession, attached gingiva, and oral lesions or pathologies. Bleeding on probing even with a gentle touch, can also occur in this situation. It is due to the periodontal probe damaging the increased blood vessels in the capillary plexus of the lamina propria, which are close to the surface because of the ulceration of the junctional epithelium.
The presence of bleeding is one of the first clinical signs of active periodontal disease in uncomplicated cases and should be recorded per individual tooth and tooth surface in the patient record. However, in patients who smoke, the gingival tissue rarely bleeds because of unknown factors that do not seem related to dental biofilm and calculus formation.

Call us today for your FREE periodontal Exam

Dr. Noushin Adhami D.D.S
www.VistasolDental.com

links between your teeth, gums, and Heart.

Your oral health could clue you in to the condition of your heart. Here’s what you should know about the links between your teeth, gums, and ticker.

You brush, floss, and follow all your dentist’s commandments for healthy teeth and gums. But did you know that those mouth-healthy habits may ultimately keep your heart healthy, too?

Research has found a surprising number of links between the state of your mouth and your heart. In fact, we now know that people who develop gum disease (either gingivitis, a milder form that results in inflammation and infection of the gums, or periodontitis, which develops when the inflammation and infection spread below the gum line) are nearly twice at risk for heart disease.
And in one study of 320 adults — half with heart disease — researchers found that these participants were also more likely to have gum disease, bleeding gums, and tooth loss.

Can Gum Disease Give You a Heart Attack?

“There is a very logical reason why the two may be connected,” Says Dr. Noushin Adhami, Dentist of Dental Surgeries at Vistasol dental.
Some types of bacteria normally occur in your mouth, but if you’re not properly flossing and brushing to remove plaque (that white film caused by bacteria that stick to your teeth after you eat), your risk for gum disease increases. And once gum disease has developed, you create an environment for bacteria that do not normally grow in your mouth, Dr Adhami says.

What’s more, because gum disease causes your gums to bleed, bacteria can move into your bloodstream, setting up an inflammatory process in the blood vessels.
How is this related to your heart? The bacteria may increase your risk for heart disease by contributing to the formation of clots or further plaque build-up in your arteries that can interfere with blood flow to the heart.
Meanwhile, researchers are also uncovering possible links between gum disease and stroke, osteoporosis, diabetes, respiratory disease, and even preterm babies.
According to the American Academy of Periodontology, half of all people over age 55 have gum disease. Gum disease is also the main reason people 35 and older lose their teeth.
Your risk for gum disease increases as you get older, but staying on top of your dental health should start in childhood. Regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups can help you keep gum disease at bay.
If you happen to notice any of these symptoms, let your dentist know immediately — they could be warning signs of gum disease.
*Sour taste in the mouth
*Persistent bad breath
*Bleeding gums
*Swollen, tender gums
*Loose teeth
*Sensitive teeth
*Pain when chewing

And remember: Preventing gum disease — or treating it with deep cleanings, medication, or surgery — may just help you prevent heart problems down the road.

Tooth decay is one of the most pervasive diseases of our time

Tooth decay is one of the most pervasive diseases of our time but modern dentistry has made major strides in the battle against cavities. Based on years of scientific and clinical research, dentists are now moving towards an approach to dental caries (tooth decay) management that is tailored to your personal risk rather than a “one size fits all.”
The previous method of “drilling and filling” to treat decay does not actually change the conditions that lead to the disease and the risk for further infection still remains. By profiling the degree of risk and implementing individualized preventive strategies, today’s dental professionals are using a more proactive approach — that works.

Dental Decay
A Dynamic Infectious Disease Process
The mouth is an ecosystem — living organisms continually interact with every other element in their environment. The teeth are composed of an outer covering of enamel, a highly mineralized crystalline structure composed mainly of calcium and phosphate. They are also bathed in a remarkable fluid — saliva, which plays a crucial role in maintaining a neutral environment or balance between the acids and bases in your mouth.
Acidity is measured by the pH scale, which ranges from 1 – 14. A pH value of 1 is extremely acidic while a pH value of 14 is extremely basic. The pH of the mouth is generally 7 — neutral.
Specific acid producing (acidogenic) bacteria attach themselves to dental plaque, the whitish sticky biofilm that collects and forms on the teeth. When you eat sugars or carbohydrates, these particular bacteria break down the sugars and produce acid as a by-product, which also makes the mouth more acid. At about pH 5.5, the minerals just below the enamel surface of the teeth begin to dissolve or “de-mineralize.” During this process, more calcium and phosphate leave the surface of the teeth than enter it — the first step in the decay process. And because the layer beneath the enamel, and the roots of teeth are made of dentin, which is softer than enamel, it is more susceptible to decay. For example, the roots of an exposed tooth will de-mineralize quickly and easily with even weak acids at pH 6.2 – 6.8, which is closer to neutral saliva.
Disease Indicators
Disease Indicators work by showing you what could happen based on what has happened. Identifying them includes the use of modern dentistry’s most sophisticated tools for early diagnosis of decay. They include:
* Visible cavities (decay) that is visible in teeth ranging from very early (microscopic) detection using, for example, laser technology, to cavities that are visible to the naked eye.
*X-ray pictures show early decay that is visible by using today’s highly sensitive yet low dosage x-rays.
*White spot lesions are the first sign of decay in the contacting areas of adjacent teeth that are often reversible with fluorides.
Cavities within the last 3 years — any previous cavities add to your risk.

Tooth Extraction procedure and post instruction

Is Tooth Extraction Painful?
What is Post Extraction Instructions?

Reasons for Pulling Teeth
Although permanent teeth were meant to last a lifetime, there are a number of reasons why tooth extraction may be needed. A very common reason involves a tooth that is too badly damaged, from trauma or decay, to be repaired.

Other reasons include:
A crowded mouth. Sometimes dentists pull teeth to prepare the mouth for orthodontia. The goal of orthodontia is to properly align the teeth, which may not be possible if your teeth are too big for your mouth. Likewise, if a tooth cannot break through the gum (erupt) because there is not room in the mouth for it, our dentist may recommend pulling it.

Infection. If tooth decay or damage extends to the pulp — the center of the tooth containing nerves and blood vessels — bacteria in the mouth can enter the pulp, leading to infection. Often this can be corrected with root canal therapy (RCT), but if the infection is so severe that antibiotics or RCT do not cure it, extraction may be needed to prevent the spread of infection.

Risk of infection. If your immune system is compromised (for example, if you are receiving chemotherapy or are having an organ transplant), even the risk of infection in a particular tooth may be reason enough to pull the tooth.

Periodontal (Gum) Disease . If periodontal disease — an infection of the tissues and bones that surround and support the teeth — have caused loosening of the teeth, it may be necessary to the pull the tooth or teeth.

What to Expect With Tooth Extraction
Dentists and oral surgeons perform tooth extractions. Before pulling the tooth, we will give you an injection of a local anesthetic to numb the area where the tooth will be removed. If you are having more than one tooth pulled or if a tooth is impacted, our dentist may use a strong general anesthetic. This will prevent pain throughout your body and make you sleep through the procedure.
If the tooth is impacted, the dentist will cut away gum and bone tissue that cover the tooth and then, using forceps, grasp the tooth and gently rock it back and forth to loosen it from the jaw bone and ligaments that hold it in place. Sometimes, a hard-to-pull tooth must be removed in pieces.Once the tooth has been pulled, a blood clot usually forms in the socket. The dentist will pack a gauze pad into the socket and have you bite down on it to help stop the bleeding. Sometimes the dentist will place a few stitches — usually self-dissolving — to close the gum edges over the extraction site.

After You’ve Had a Tooth Pulled
Following an extraction, we will send you home to recover. Recovery typically takes a few days. The following can help minimize discomfort, reduce the risk of infection, and speed recovery.
* Take painkillers as prescribed.
* Bite firmly but gently on the gauze pad placed by your dentist to reduce bleeding and allow a clot to form in the tooth socket. Change gauze pads before they become soaked with blood. Otherwise, leave the pad in place for three to four hours after the extraction.
* Apply an ice bag to the affected area immediately after the procedure to keep down swelling. Apply ice for 10 minutes at a time.
* Relax for at least 24 hours after the extraction. Limit activity for the next day or two.
* Avoid rinsing or spitting forcefully for 24 hours after the extraction to avoid dislodging the clot that forms in the socket.
* After 24 hours, rinse with your mouth with a solution made of 1/2 teaspoon salt and 8 ounces of warm water.
* Do not drink from a straw for the first 24 hours.
* Do not smoke, which can inhibit healing.
* Eat soft foods, such as soup, pudding, yogurt, or applesauce the day after the extraction. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as the extraction site heals.
* When lying down, prop your head with pillows. Lying flat may prolong bleeding.
* Continue to brush and floss your teeth, and brush your tongue, but be sure to avoid the extraction site. Doing so will help prevent infection.